The grammar, morphology and syntax of the Portuguese languages, is like to the grammar of most other Romance languages; particularly Galician and the other languages of Iberian Peninsula. Portuguese is a synthetic, fusional language. It has a number of grammatical features that distinguish it from most other Romance languages, such as a synthetic pluperfect, a future subjunctive tense, the inflected infinitive, and a present perfect with an iterative sense. A unique feature of Portuguese is mesoclisis, the infixing of clitic pronouns in some verbal forms.

Unlike English, Portuguese nouns have gender, denotation that every noun is considered to be either masculine or feminine. Portuguese adjectives come after the nouns they modify, and must match the gender and number of the noun (singular and plural). Portuguese verbs are conjugated to demonstrate person and tense. However, some of the verb forms usually used in Brazilian Portuguese, such as the continuous verb forms, varies from those of European Portuguese. Morphologically, a particularly remarkable characteristic of the grammar of Portuguese is the verb, because it has more verbal inflections from classical Latin have been conserved by Portuguese than any other main Romance language.

Brazilian Portuguese has also developed a diverse system for the placement of object pronouns. In the same way, Brazilians have dropped the difference between you-formal and you-familiar that subsists in European Portuguese. The formal você form of address is used for all opportunities when speaking Portuguese in Brazil. It is also common to address someone in the third person in order to be polite.


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